26 Responses

  1. […] Speaking of comparing mezcal to wine, the colourful lineup of varietals from El Jolgorio reminded me of bottles you’d find at a boutique winery. Except instead of being filled with grape juice, they’re full of the holy nectar called mezcal. And apparently, I’m a fan of the Tobala varietal, though I can’t really afford to be. [$US115] […]

  2. […] Speaking of comparing mezcal to wine, the colorful lineup of varietals from El Jolgorio reminded me of bottles you’d find at a boutique winery. Except instead of being filled with grape juice, they’re full of the holy nectar called mezcal. And apparently, I’m a fan of the Tobala varietal, though I can’t really afford to be. [$115] […]

  3. […] Speaking of comparing mezcal to wine, the colorful lineup of varietals from El Jolgorio reminded me of bottles you’d find at a boutique winery. Except instead of being filled with grape juice, they’re full of the holy nectar called mezcal. And apparently, I’m a fan of the Tobala varietal, though I can’t really afford to be. [$115] […]

  4. Fernando Menoyo at |

    Greetings, I see some natural “seed ” small
    bowls in your photos along with the Mezcal bottles as if they are used to drink the Mezcal. What are they?

    Reply
    1. Mezcal PhD at |

      If you mean the colorful little ceramic ones, I bought them in Oaxaca. I have a lot of them so they are good when I am tasting because I can line up a bunch of bottles and sip from the same style cup. They only hold about an ounce. And as you can see they are really pretty so they make a nice presentation……thanks for reading!

      Reply
  5. […] to read the complete article go to this link: https://www.mezcalphd.com/2013/11/el-jolgorio-a-boutique-mezcal-with-many-varietals/ […]

  6. dennis at |

    Hate to ask….. but, do you use a mixer with the Mezcal?

    Thanks

    Reply
    1. Mezcal PhD at |

      No problem asking! You can absolutely consume mezcal in cocktails! And I do frequently. But I also enjoy it neat. I would hesitate to put any of these Jolgorios in a cocktail because they are quite expensive and also really too good on their own to put in a cocktail. You can if you want but I think much of their brilliance would be wasted.

      However, there are many fine mezcals that are great in cocktails. See this post for guidance: https://www.mezcalphd.com/2014/05/mezcal-starter-kit-brands-price-comparisons-and-more/

      Also, check out my book, Holy Smoke! It’s Mezcal! (a whopping $20 on Amazon), for some great cocktail recipes if you want to go that route! Either way, drink mezcal!!

      Reply
      1. Matt at |

        I would also like to add, that I don’t mix it but really enjoy a classic style of Sangrita back (on the side). It’s typical to have a sip of Sangria in between sips of Mezcal to cleanse the palette. (Similar to how pickled ginger is consumed while eating sushi) That being said, I prefer the classic style of Sangrita made of pomegranate juice and citrus with chile opposed to the tomato based Sangrita.

        Reply
        1. Mezcal PhD at |

          Thanks. I think of sangrita for tequila and sal de gusano with orange slices for mezcal. But I love sangria so why not with mezcal! Thanks for contributing.

          Reply
  7. Douglas at |

    Part of the deal for the USA and global market is : If you put a product on the market and your customers like it , you as a producer have kind of and unwritten moral ( commercial) obligation to keep supplying/delivering it in a timely fashion . I see all these brands that are owned by chilangos and gringos, energetically coming onto the market , They are doing a great job and being received very well by the consumers .It is like a home run for the mezcal catagory, it is great for someone like me who worked for 20 years to open the path for all mezcaleros to walk/run. My question is , especially with the varietals,
    my question is : will they be able to give the market a continuous supply. Where will the product come from? In the espadin catagory , ok , there is probably 10,000,000 liters being made a year( most of it uncertified, but it can be crtified in a hearbeat , the CRM will be happy to do that) and just under 1,000,000 being exported . You can do like Ron , grab a dozen palenques and bottle the hell out of their espadin products and deliver maybe 100,000 lts a year to the USA . That goes pretty far, its great business for the bottler, Ron, and good for the palanquero , but a varietal???? Where is the maguey supposed to come from? Wild maguey in the mountains . Have you ever hiked the Sirerra Madre Sur to cut wild maguey? I have , there maguey , but is is few and far between . And when you cut what you find , you leave a negative behind in your footsteps. The producers have an obligation( unwritten moral law) to plant as much as they cut and process each year . As long as this is not happening , the agave will be in short supply or non existent for future generations.
    So my friends drink hearty and buy some extra to put away for the future , because I have a quisey feeling in my gut that my conpanero mezcaleros wonderful products may not all be on the shelf forever. You have to understand that these are rare gems made by master mezcaleros in a place where time and history blends with the ages, the comercialization , global marketing is not part of the heart beat that drives them (yet) . The individual essence of the maguey and cooking drives them , and the exquisite product is the result. Today. Manana may be different.
    May Mayahuel be with you.

    Reply
  8. Douglas at |

    Scorpion Mezcal has a Tobala Silver 750 ml. and a Tobala Extra Anejo 750 ml. that we introduced in 2012 or 2013 , I don’t remember when it actually got to the US market . We also launched a Aficionado Varietal Tasting box with 4 bottles , 200 ml each . One is Espadin , one is Barril, one is Tequilana and the 4th bottle is Tobala. The idea is that several people can sit down and sip the 4 varietals side by side to compare the different flavors. The box costs between $80 and $100 depending on freight and taxes in the different parts of the country .
    I will be presenting Barril Silver and Anejo, and Arroqueno Silver and Anejo tward the latter part of this year.

    Reply
    1. Mezcal PhD at |

      Thanks for the info Doug. I like the idea of the tasting box and trying the varietals side by side. You are indeed prolific!

      Reply
  9. eguixa at |

    So if the companies are sending you products to taste them and you respond them with flowers no matter the quality related to those “products” what we can infer? You are just another link in the mercenary chain living (sucking) at the expense of the Mezcal (organic, “boutique”, traditional, industrial, etc) without giving anything good for the industry besides of a ridiculous “post”.

    Reply
    1. Mezcal PhD at |

      Glad you enjoyed my “post” so much. Not sure why you gave “post” quotation marks so I will too! Have you tried Jolgorio? Yes, they did send me samples which I obviously disclosed. Plenty of others have sent me samples as well, but do you find anything about those brand here? Nope. If I don’t like it, I probably won’t write much if anything about it. You don’t see many specific reviews from me, just overall comments from my various tastings. Have you looked before you wrote? How many brand specific reviews other than Jolgorio will you find on my site? Zero. So your comments are way off base my friend.

      For me (clearly not you), mezcal is fun. My blog is fun. No one pays me to do it. It is a passion and I attempt to be fair and informative while providing a resource to learn about mezcal. You have now left 2 hostile and aggressive comments on my blog. Clearly you have an axe to grind or an agenda which you keep hidden. You probably work or shill for some shitty mezcal so you attack everyone else. Guessing it is Zignum since that is the other “post” you chose to attack.

      I don’t mind you posting comments though. They entertain me and perhaps some of my readers too. And I would say that you should do your homework before you start writing but then it wouldn’t probably be as much fun for me! So keep firing from the hip, but before you do perhaps you need a nice mezcal to take the edge off buddy….try Jolgorio!

      Reply
  10. constance finley at |

    Do you have a service wherein you provide these mescals? My life is crazy, I have a start up company of cannabis oil for stage 4 cancer patients–oncologist referred and followed-quite legal–i think tequila is great. apparently I should graduate to mescal. I also think there’s possibly an interesting herbal connection between cannabis and mescal. Know anything about that or am I crazy?

    Reply
    1. Mezcal PhD at |

      Yes, you are crazy. 🙂

      There is no botanical connection between cannabis and mezcal, but that does not mean you cannot ingest them at approximately the same time. I don’t sell mezcal but you can buy these Jolgorio mezcals and http://www.andrewswinecellar.com. Good prices too! Enjoy.

      Reply
  11. Bob at |

    Was lucky enough to try the Arroqueno and Madrecuixe on a visit to Oaxaca a few months back. Both delightful – you’re not kidding about the Madrecuixe being anything but subtle, but that’s probably why I came back for more. Big and in your face and dares you to try and tease it apart. Being a fan of mezcal in Australia, as I am, is a pretty difficult proposition as there isn’t much of value available but it’s good to see more and more interesting varietal stuff becoming available outside of Mexico at least.

    Reply
    1. Mezcal PhD at |

      Yes that Madrecuixe is bold! And I too find myself drawn to mezcals which have a polarizing taste. As for Australia, keep the faith. I routinely get emails from importers, distributors, and Australian entrepreneurs asking me what I know about the Australian market (nothing), and what brands may be looking to sell there. So there is a bunch of noise, and I am sure you will see more and more brands coming your way. Thanks for reading! Drink mezcal.

      Reply
  12. Joe G at |

    Just picked up a bottle of Nuestra Soledad by El Jolgorio @ Cask in San Francisco.

    Reply
    1. Mezcal PhD at |

      Cool. Let me know what you think!

      Reply
  13. Eric Lorenz at |

    Great article.

    I assume some of your readers are in Canada as well – so, for their interest, El Jolgorio has been available in Western Canada since February 2013. Here’s a product locator map!
    http://www.agavespirits.com/products-el-jolgorio-mezcal.php

    Saludos,
    Eric

    Reply
    1. Mezcal PhD at |

      The link may be a sly promo for your website, but I like it anyway. Thanks for contributing!

      Reply
  14. Sonia Gomez at |

    Your blogs are becoming more and more interesting, fun to read and learn about my favorite drink!

    Reply
  15. Earl (Popeye) Fish at |

    thanks a lot Doc!
    A suggestion: come back to Oaxaca (or come for the first time if you have not been here) and bring back enough mezcal to pay for your ticket.
    Just a sugqgestion of course.
    And thanks again for your self-proclaimed bullshit

    Reply
    1. Mezcal PhD at |

      Earl, I don’t think I own enough luggage to bring back as much as I would want to. All ideas on how I can travel back with maximum mezcal are welcome!!

      Reply

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