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  1. anthony goffe at |

    Dear Sir,
    Thanks for a very informative piece on the alcoholic possibilities of the Agave plant.
    In Jamaica, back in the 50’s and ’60’s, (until the advent of extrudable plastics), on our dry southern coastal plains, at least 2,000 acres of Agave Sisalana was cultivated.
    Rope and twine were the final products.
    You say there are many species of Agave that may be used in alcohol production. How would one go about determining the concentration of our local sisals in this respect ? Would it be simple process ? Any suggestions welcome.
    Sincerely,
    Anthony Goffe,
    Mandeville,
    Jamaica

    Reply
  2. M at |

    Thank you so much for the article and after reading your article I better understand the differences between different kinds of mezcal.

    Will definitely love trying different kinds of Mezcal and possibly I will be able to find a way to get Mezcal that is usually only in Mexico even though I live in America.

    Thank you again for the wonderful article and all the best to you,

    M

    Reply
  3. Marcos G at |

    Ok Guys
    I will clean up this mess ..

    Raicilla is divided in two areas, Sierra or Costa ( coast or mountain ) .. the sierra kind is MOSTLY made from Agave Maximiliana, this is actually the one referred to raicilla commonly ( maximiliana is NOT KNOWN as pata de mula, thats another variety ), Sierra Raicillas tend to be more floral and YES they are smoky, smoke doesnt necessary comes from underground cooking process, smokiness comes from wood, adobe and volcanic rocks .. the more of those ingredients present in the cooking process the more smokiness, the most fragant, balanced and flavorfull raicillas are made in the Sierra Region in my personal opinion as costa tend to be very mineral tasting.. The costa region uses a wide variety of agaves ( weve counted around 8 ) some of most importance are orejon, verde, rodacantha etc..

    THERE ARE amazing raicillas, THERE IS great branding, probably better than MOST mezcals and tequilas out there, just check out NINFA ( ninfaraicilla.com) or estancia ( estancia-raicilla.com) ..

    Cheers

    Reply
  4. […] national system to classify locally made booze, called a Denominacion de Origen. Agave spirits made outside those recognized regions, such as raicilla, sotol, and bacanora, aren’t part of the […]

  5. rosco betunada at |

    skimmed thru’ once before, um … after I came back from P.V. (axually’ Sigh-U-leeta) where I encountered Raicilla, only to then learn Tequila/Mezcal “wasn’t everything.” This was Feb. 2016 — tried to get Raicilla from local store — which they either wouldn’t or couldn’t get, but they had Sotol! the “top shelf” is the h.deCHIH ANEJO which I find to be eminently sip-able by itself, no ice, etc. so, i’ll try to find bacanora …

    Just wanted to say “thanks” for this exposition of ALL THINGS AGAVE (distilled spirits therefrom).

    Reply
    1. Douglas at |

      I’ve been bringing Raicilla home from PV for about 10 years now. First bottle was from Juan Duenos in an Adobe hut above San Sebastian del Oeste. Many of the tourist trap “tequila factories” have it if you know to ask. Last trip I picked up a bottle of Raicilla Reposado at the Botanical Gardens, first time I’ve seen it with a tax stamp on it and the most I’ve ever paid too. Also the smokiest I’ve had. There’s still plenty of Mexican moonshine available when you get off the beaten path too.

      Reply
  6. rosco betunada at |

    skimmed thru’ once before, um … after I came back from P.V. (axually’ Sigh-U-leeta) where I encountered Raicilla, only to then learn Tequila/Mezcal “wasn’t everything.” This was Feb. 2016 — tried to get Raicilla from local store — which they either wouldn’t or couldn’t get, but they had Sotol! the “top shelf” is the h.deCHIH ANEJO which I find to be eminently sip-able by itself, no ice, etc. so, i’ll try to find bacanora …

    Just wanted to say “thanks” for this exposition of ALL THINGS AGAVE (distilled spirits therefrom).

    Reply
  7. […] Mezcal, Tequila, Sotol, Bacanora, Raicilla, Pulque, and More… […]

  8. elrichiboy at |

    Most sotoles are cooked in the ground, like mezcal. The only one that I know of that’s cooked in ovens is Hacienda de Chihuahua, which is produced like tequila.

    Reply
  9. […] Mezcal PhD has a really useful article and chart of agave […]

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